Monkeys With Guns: Scenarios

Thank God we’re back to paragraphs. WordPress doesn’t copy line breaks correctly, reformatting lists is a pain, paragraphs are much faster. All this reformatting has taken about 40-ish minutes. That’s not bad considering I’m queueing up over a week’s worth of posts at once, but it’s still about four times as long as it would’ve taken to format a similar wordcount in paragraphs.

A scenario is a specific set of victory conditions and sometimes battlefield conditions or troop restrictions. Certain scenarios favor certain types of armies. When playing a one-off scenario, there is no reason not to optimize your army to take advantage of the specific objectives involved. For situations where flexibility is more important than hyper-specialization, see the campaign rules in the next section.

Ambush

Sometimes, one troop just wants another troop dead, and will catch them unawares to do it.

Objective: The attacker is victorious if they are able to eliminate more than half of the defender’s platoons. The defender is victorious if they are able to successfully retreat more than half of their own platoons off of the battlefield.

Setup: In an ambush, the attacker sets up terrain for the entire battlefield. The defender deploys on one of the broad edges, with all units at least 24 squares from either narrow edge and no more than 12 squares from the edge they’re deploying from. The attacker deploys from both the narrow edges up to 12 squares from the edge as normal, and from the opposite broad edge up to 24 squares from the edge.

Special Rules: The defender may retreat primates and vehicles off of any edge except the edge they deployed from. The attacker may retreat primates and vehicles off of any edge.

Battle

Usually, when two troops fight one another at full force, it’s because both of them want the same patch of territory and both are willing to fight to secure it.

Objective: The first troop that controls over half of the victory points for a full round is the winner.

Setup: One player should set up terrain for the battlefield, and the other should choose which edge to deploy from. Alternatively, each player should set up the terrain for one half of the battlefield, and which player deploys from which edge should be chosen randomly. Either way, a total of either five or seven victory points should be placed on the battlefield during setup. At least half (that is, three or five) of these victory points should be 24 squares away from both edges. The remaining should be at least 12 squares from both edges. Each edge should have the same number of victory points 12-24 squares from their position. For example, in a five point game, three of the victory points will be in the central area 24 squares away from either edge. The other two may be as close as 12 squares from the edge, however if one edge has a victory point 12-24 squares from it, the other should as well. You can also just place all victory points in the central area 24 squares from each edge.

Special Rules: In order to control a victory point, a troop must be the only one with primates on that objective. Victory points which have been captured remain in possession of the troop that captured them even if empty, so long as no enemy primates enter the radius of the objective, however victory points with primates from two or more troops on them are contested, and do not count for either side’s objective.

Once a troop controls at least half the victory points on the battlefield, they may declare they have battlefield control at the end of their platoon’s turn. If, by the time of that platoon’s next turn, the player has continuously controlled at least half of the victory points on the map, that player is the winner. If a player who has declared battlefield control, drops to controlling less than half the victory points, and then regains control of the victory points before the turn of the platoon they declared with, that does not count. Half of the victory points must be held continuously for a full round to achieve victory.

Scavenging

When two troops both find an unlooted Precursor ruin, they can almost never come to an agreement as to how to divide the loot. Instead, both of them try to gather up as much as they can while shooting as much as they can at their rivals to scare them off from taking their own.

Objective: The troop that escapes the battlefield with the most loot is victorious.

Setup: One player should set up terrain for the battlefield, and the other should choose which edge to deploy from. Alternatively, each player should set up the terrain for one half of the battlefield, and which player deploys from which edge should be chosen randomly. Either way, a total of 25 scrap per platoon should be placed on the battlefield during setup. Each piece of scrap occupies one square and that square is difficult terrain until the scrap is removed.

Special Rules: Squads may, as an action, gather scrap. Any primate in the squad who is currently adjacent to a piece of scrap gathers up that scrap and places it in their inventory. Scrap is a medium size object and takes up inventory space like one. If a primate is wounded, injured, or routed, they drop any scrap they were carrying in their square. It is possible for one square to hold multiple scrap in this way, in which case a primate taking the scavenge action can only harvest one piece of scrap from it at a time. A primate adjacent to a vehicle can load scrap into that vehicle without taking an action. Every 10 scrap loaded into a vehicle takes up one passenger position, and vehicles with no more room for passengers also cannot hold more scrap.

Primates and vehicles who retreat off the same edge they deployed from add any scrap they’ve gathered to their troop’s total. If one side is completely cleared from the battlefield, the remaining side may harvest any scrap remaining on the battlefield automatically. The troop that has harvested the most scrap is the winner. Because of this, once one troop has secured over half of the scrap on the field, they may be declared the winner immediately if the players do not wish to play out the rest of the battle.

Siege

Sometimes it happens that one troop of military monkeys would like to get into a location that another troop wants them kept out of. A troop on the warpath might turn up at their arch-rival’s fortress seeking to destroy their home, or one troop might stake a claim on a precursor ruin only for another to happen along and challenge that claim.

Objective: The attacker is victorious when they control three of the five objectives in the defender’s inner sanctum (see setup below). The defender is victorious when all attacker primates have been removed from the battlefield.

Setup: From the attacker’s edge of the field out to 24 squares from that edge is no monkey’s land. To set up terrain for this area, first the attacker places a terrain feature, then the defender, then the attacker again, and so on, until 25% (288 squares) of the battlefield has been covered. From the defender’s edge of the board out to 24 squares from the attacker’s edge is a fortified area where the defender may place whatever terrain they like, wherever they like, in whatever density they like. From the defender’s edge of the board out to 24 squares from that edge is the inner sanctum, the position which the defender must hold. The defender places three victory points here, and the attacker places two. Each victory point is centered on a specific square and covers a two-square radius surrounding that square.

Special Rules: In order to control a victory point, a troop must be the only one with primates on that objective. Victory points which have been captured remain in possession of the troop that captured them even if empty, so long as no enemy primates enter the radius of the objective, however victory points with primates from two or more troops on them are contested, and do not count for either side’s objective.

The attacker gets 500 scrap per platoon rather than the standard 400.

The attacker may retreat primates and vehicles off the edge of the battlefield if defeat is certain and they don’t wish to drag things out, however the defender may not retreat.

Skirmish

When two hostile troops happen across one another, sometimes they stare each other down and then both break off to get back to whatever they were doing earlier. Sometimes, however, when the spite between the two is strong or when one or both assume the other is going to make a move and decides to preempt, a bloody battle breaks out in the wilderness.

Objective: When only one troop still has primates on the battlefield, that troop is the winner of the skirmish.

Setup: One player should set up the terrain for the battlefield, and the other should decide which edge of the two narrow edges of the field to deploy from. Alternatively, each player should set up the terrain for one half of the battlefield, and which player deploys from which edge should be determined randomly.

Special Rules: In a skirmish battle, primates and vehicles may retreat off the edge of the board. The utility of this is mainly in campaign play, but even in a one-shot game it is usually courteous to withdraw remaining forces after defeat is certain rather than drag out the game with a final stand.

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